LUUANDA

2019
Luanda, 2019
Luanda, 2019
Luanda, 2019
Luanda, 2019
Luanda, 2019
Luanda, 2019
Luanda, 2019
Luanda, 2019
Installation views, LUUANDA Artist Residency, 2019
Colectivo Pés Descalços and Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation

Tchon d'Holanda

2017-2019
72x108cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2018
72x108cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2018
120x90cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2018
72x108cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
72x108cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2018
120x80cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
30x40cm, Tchon d’Holanda, 2019
Installation view, Ci.CLO Photography Biennial, Porto, 2019
Installation view, Ci.CLO Photography Biennial, Porto, 2019
Installation view, Ci.CLO Photography Biennial, Porto, 2019. Image courtesy Ci.CLO.

Photographed over a period of 3 years, this project developed through an immersion into an agricultural and human territory that, although small in size, presents enormous complexity and heterogeneity.
The agricultural perimeter named Tchon d’Holanda (meaning “Dutch Land”) is a project of the government of Cape Verde, with funding from the Dutch Cooperation.
The technology behind this initiative was the use of treated wastewater from the sewage plant for the irrigation of vegetables and fruit plants. The introduction of this technology was expected to encourage the extension of the agricultural area in Ribeira de Vinha and mitigate the adverse environmental conditions and water scarcity. In the field, I met dozens of farmers who complained about access to limited amount of water and lack of investment and monitoring in the short, medium and long term. These conditions have resulted in a situation of neglect and isolation, while soil and crops have been continuously deteriorating, affecting the approximately 90 farmers who subsist here very precariously.
Still, whenever I visit my acquaintances there, they always offer me a piece of whatever is growing in their vegetable gardens.
The many seed packets I collected are just an indication of how farmers are held hostage to commercially available seeds in Cape Verde, imported from several western countries and poorly adapted to the local climate, with serious consequences on the impoverishment of local and national genetic and cultural heritage.
In addition to the usual difficulties of subsistence agriculture practiced in Cape Verde, this “enclosed garden” is an example of the typical contradictions of international cooperation, leading to the negligence and marginalization of enormous human capital and a wealth of accumulated knowledge and experience.

Tchon d'Holanda was created with support of Ci.CLO Photography Biennial and was presented in the collective exhibition "Adaptation and Transition" (2019) curated by Virgílio Ferreira.

Standard Deviation

2017-2019
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2017
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2017
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2019
90x60cm, Standard Deviation, 2017
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2019
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2019
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2017
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2017
50x75cm, Standard Deviation, 2017
90x60cm, Standard Deviation, 2017
Installation view, Chateau d’Eau, Toulouse, 2019
Installation view, Chateau d’Eau, Toulouse, 2019
Installation view, Capa Center, Budapest, 2019. Image courtesy João Tuna / Parallel Platform.
Installation view, Capa Center, Budapest, 2019. Image courtesy João Tuna / Parallel Platform.

This work was produced in the scope of PARALLEL European Photo Based Platform and presented in the collective exhibitions "Currents Shift" (2019) at the Chateau d’Eau, in Toulouse, France, curated by Jon Uriarte, and "Zeitgeist" (2019) at the Robert Capa Contemporary Photography Center, in Budapest, Hungary, curated by Judit Gellér and Emese Mucsi.

Escuta os Bárbaros em Primeiro Lugar

2016
Km 6, São Vicente, Cabo Verde, 2016
Km 6, São Vicente, Cabo Verde, 2016
Km 6, São Vicente, Cabo Verde, 2016
Km 6, São Vicente, Cabo Verde, 2016
Chã de Feijoal, Santo Antão, Cabo Verde, 2016
Chã de Feijoal, Santo Antão, Cabo Verde, 2016
Chã de Feijoal, Santo Antão, Cabo Verde, 2016
Installation View, BF16 Award, Vila Franca de Xira Photography Biennial, 2016
Installation View, BF16 Award, Vila Franca de Xira Photography Biennial, 2016
Installation View, BF16 Award, Vila Franca de Xira Photography Biennial, 2016
Installation View, BF16 Award, Vila Franca de Xira Photography Biennial, 2016
Installation View, BF16 Award, Vila Franca de Xira Photography Biennial, 2016
Installation View, BF16 Award, Vila Franca de Xira Photography Biennial, 2016

Journey

2014
Artist Book (with Jorge Almeida)
Cryptogamic plants are liable to bud-variation, for fronds on the same fern often display remarkable deviations of structure. Spores, which are of the nature of buds, taken from such abnormal fronds, reproduce, with remarkable fidelity, the same variety, after passing through the sexual stage.
This fruit is remarkable on account of the number of species which have been cultivated, and from their rapid improvement within the last fifty or sixty years. At the present day the varieties of the several species are almost innumerable. The species consist of, firstly, the wood or Alpine cultivated strawberries, descended from Fragaria vesca, a native of Europe and of North America. Secondly, the green strawberries, descended from the European F. collina. Thirdly, the Hautbois, from the European F. elatior. Fourthly, the Scarlets, descended from F. virginiana, a native of the whole breadth of North America. Fifthly, the Chili, descended from F. chiloensis, an inhabitant of the west coast of the temperate parts both of North and South America. Lastly, the pines or Carolinas (including the old Blacks), which have been ranked by most authors under the name of F. grandiflora as a distinct species, said to inhabit Surinam; but this is a manifest error.

For Journey, me and my friend and designer Jorge Almeida approached a peri-urban area in the outskirts of our hometown and walked alongside roads, marginal lands, abandoned fields and fallow territory. We were attracted to these places where the apparent sense of wilderness is, nevertheless, contaminated by the human presence. Our attention is deflected to the wild plants that grow under the influence of cultural and agricultural practices, thus living in a defiant space between wilderness and unintentional domestication.
The excerpts adapted from Darwin's "The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication" teaches us that very few things in the world still remain in their wild, original state, and that the human influence is much more subtle than we might at first imagine (notwithstanding, that's not even quite accurate nowadays).
Within our artist book, text has the function of providing some context, while, more predominantly, introducing new meanings and possibilities for understanding the images.

Finalist at Unseen Dummy Award 2014
Finalist at Dummy Award Kassel 2015
Part of On Landscape Project, Matèria Gallery, Rome, 2015

Casa para Outros

2013
Walk into the house
The place – between walls – is darkened
feel the atmosphere and look carefully.

Inside here, after all,
in this upside down world,
illegality of occupation
is the right to housing.

Site-specific installation, Temporary Occupations, Next Future Programme, 2013
with Rita Rainho and Ângelo Lopes
and workers Jorge Andrade, José Évora, Ravi Santos and Stefan Andrade

Cabral ka Mori

2010-2011
Actor José Barros during the play "Retratinho de Amílcar Cabral"
A production of TEATROMOSCA, Casa de Teatro de Sintra, 2011
A Natural Park in the present days, the mountains of Serra Malagueta are located very close to the home where Amílcar Cabral grew up as a young man. I would simply be speculating if I said that he was familiar with this territory and that this conviviality had an influence on his choice to study Agronomy but, having worked here three years prior to making this photograph, I learnt that this landscape is charged with deep symbolic significance, having been one of the main places of refuge in the island of Santiago for those who escaped slavery. I understand that moment to be one of the earliest acts of rebellion against colonialism, while Amílcar Cabral himself lead a similar act of resistance many centuries later.
Serra Malagueta, Santiago, Cabo Verde, 2011
Liceu Velho, São Vicente, Cabo Verde, 2011
A short pen stroke near the right margin of this archival photograph indicates the presence of Amílcar Cabral in the image.
Fundação Mário Soares, Lisboa, Portugal, 2011
Amílcar Cabral lived in this house during his childhood, following his parents' return to Cape Verde from Guinea Bissau in 1932, where he had been born.
Santa Catarina, Santiago, Cabo Verde, 2011